VEGAN DIETS ARE RESTRICTIVE

VEGAN DIETS ARE RESTRICTIVE


I’m a vegan. And amongst other things, that means that I don’t eat any animal foods. So it means I don’t pay for people to chop animals’ heads off, and I don’t eat their flesh. Well, I’m an adult, I don’t consume any milk anyway, and I certainly don’t eat any eggs, which have come out of a chicken’s cloaca. That’s just gross. And other gross things include vomit products like honey, and spit products like bird’s nest soup, and other random, crazy stuff that people eat in other countries. But one of the main things people say to me when they find out I’m vegan is, “Oh, my god. I couldn’t do that; it’s so restrictive! You have to restrict all of your food. You can’t eat anything!” Well, that’s exactly what we’re going to talk about today, so stay tuned! So the USDA has already done all the hard work and found out what Americans actually eat, so I just went ahead and downloaded the data and sifted through it all. It’s quite a large spreadsheet with lots of tabs and stuff, but I’ve worked out what people eat on average in America. Let’s start off with a good old-fashioned pie chart, so 25% of what people eat in America is animal-based foods, 63% is processed, AKA junk food, then only 6% is fresh fruits and vegetables, and the other 6% is fruits and vegetables in the form of processed foods. That means if we strip it back to the basic ingredients, the average American meat-eater is eating a diet of oil, fats, refined sugar, refined grains, flesh, milk, and eggs. 94% of their calories is coming from that, and only 6% is coming from truly fresh fruits and vegetables. This sounds completely bizarre, but I assure you, this is from the USDA; this isn’t made up from some blog. This is official statistics. So the data is basically saying the per capita consumption in calories per day of various foods. So using this data, we can see what the average, normal person in America, meat-eater not restricting their diet in any way will be consuming. What sort of foods they’ll be eating, but we’ll have to make some rules for this. Let’s say that the minimum threshold to be able to claim that you actually eat a food is 0.1 calories per day on average for vegetables, and 1 calorie per day for fruit and nuts. So this is a measly 37 calories of that food per year for vegetables, or 365 per year of fruit and nuts. So that’s basically just like one meal a year, if you’re just eating that food in abundance. So let’s apply this rule and see what comes out: So we’ve got potatoes, but that’s actually mainly because of french fries, we’ve got tomatoes mainly, again, because of pizza, we’ve got sweet corn, carrots, sweet potatoes; we’ve got garlic, broccoli, chili, lettuce, peppers; peas, cabbage, cucumbers, onions, mushrooms; celery, squash, snap beans, lima beans, spinach; sprouts, artichokes, cauliflower, asparagus, eggplant. That concludes all of the vegetables, so for the nuts we have: peanuts, almonds, pecans, walnuts, coconut, pistachios. And then for the fruits we got: apples, oranges, bananas, grapes; avocado, raisins, pineapple, strawberry; pears, peaches, olives, watermelon; cranberries, dates, plums, and blueberries. So counting all of that up, this is all of the fruits and vegetables and nuts which is widely consumed in America, and it comes to 47 different things, include flesh, dairy, eggs, the vomit products like honey, oil, fat sugar, refined grains. Also include chemicals as well, so 56 things in total which meat-eaters generally consume in America. So if we look at that, that’s actually 94% of the calories consumed is actually comprised of just nine foods, whereas 6% of the calories consumed is the 47 fruits and vegetables and nuts consumed, or if you want to look at that differently with the processed or non processed vegetables, it’s a slightly different percentage, but whatever, it’s basically the same. So if we get rid of the stuff that vegans don’t eat, or try and reduce the minimally processed foods, and and look at what I eat on my ostensibly restrictive vegan diet, and I actually am more of a whole foods vegan, so bear that in mind; that could be interpreted as even more restrictive than just a junk food vegan, but let’s apply the same rules of the 0.1 and 1 calories. So in addition to all those foods, which I eat as well, I also eat durian when I’m in Asia, loads of mangoes, loads of rambutans, guava, jackfruit; passion fruit, dragon fruit, snake fruit – I love snake fruit, cherimoyas, mangosteens- heaps of them; papayas, pomelos, rose apples, langsat – really nice, lychee is one of my favorites; sapodillas – also a real big favorite when they’re ripe, persimmons – probably my favorite fruit when I can get the ripe, Japanese variety physalis, mulberries, cherries, carob. Now some of the grains that I eat: I’m really into my quinoa, I also eat spelt and rice – especially in terms of whole wheat bread, amaranth is so-so – I eat it sometimes, millet – I’m a massive fan of millet, sometimes I have corn in the form of (???), I sometimes have buckwheat, I really like my black rice and red rice, oats is my caloric staple, I love my alfalfa sprouts. All of my beans: the azuki, black beans, fava beans, chickpeas; kidney beans, and lentils – who sort of disregarded; I eat about eight different types of lentils. But anyway, butter beans, mung beans; pinto beans, probably my favorite being soya beans, tofu, and tempeh products. Now some vegetables: I love my collard greens, I like a bit of fennel every now and again, kale is one of my favorite greens; kohlrabi is really cool sometimes when it’s in season, leek – again, don’t mind about leek, have that sometimes parsley – allot of parsley; I love a bit of rhubarb when it’s in season, and beetroot is one of my most common vegetables I use, turnip when I get it (???). Again, when it’s in season, it’s quite nice; chestnuts – when they’re in season I really like those as well, cassava – when I get my hands on it, it’s quite nice. Now some seeds that I eat on a regular basis: hemp, flax, sesame, and chia every day. I eat one of those or multiple ones of those. Some more fruits as a sort of: pomegranate, grapefruit, kiwis; blackberries – mostly frozen, with my red currants – also frozen; kumquat when they’re in season, soursop when I’m in Asia, and I love to get figs every time I’m in Italy. Definitely eating allot of my figs. So let’s count up all these foods, and just to be clear, I eat allot more than the threshold I’ve put there, so all these foods I definitely do eat on at least a yearly basis. So that makes 65 in addition to the other 47 we already worked out. So in total, that makes: 112, which is by sheer coincidence. I do promise I didn’t actually work that in advance. It is coincidentally exactly double what I previously got from the meat-eaters. So before we get into the next section, which I want to discuss, let’s just do a quick summary. Whole food vegans try and eat 100% of their calories from whole foods, hence the name, But let’s just put ten percent in there anyway just to cover some sort of allowance, or something. So, meat-eaters: 25% animal foods, 63% processed foods, and only 6% from actual fresh fruits and vegetables, the other 6% is processed fruits and vegetables. So this means that bizarrely 94% of a meat-eater’s diet is processed, animal foods, whereas only 10% processed, 0% animal foods for a vegan. 6% fruits and vegetables, whereas 90% fruits and vegetables for a whole foods vegan. So the average American meat-eater consumes only 56 foods in total in their diet That’s just like, the nominal threshold that we picked, whereas I consume double that at 112 foods in total. And as we all know, consuming allot of processed junk and animal foods is likely to cause disease, whereas eating fruits vegetables is very healthy. The average meat-eater clearly lacks allot of variety in comparison to something which I would eat. So which one is more restrictive? Hmm… I wonder. I don’t know. Hmm… I know what you’re gonna say, “Here in England, we eat loads of stuff! We don’t just eat vegetables! We eat roast dinners, and omelets, and bacon and eggs, and I have some bangers and mash, my cottage pie, and the fish and chips, my hot pot, my pasties, and pie and mash, and pork pies, and shepherd’s pie, and apple pie, and crumble, and scones, and chicken tikka masala!” And you lot in America are gonna be saying, “Yeah, but I’ve got my cheeseburgers, I’ve got my hot dogs, I’ve got my nachos, and pizza I got my steak and fries, my BLT, my ribs, my buffalo wings, my fried chicken, my… *Laughs* macaroni and cheese, meatloaf, jerky, pot roast, and BBQ. Yeehaw!” *Laughs* Yeah, but if you work it all out, the ingredients contained within all those dishes is basically just the same thing repeated heaps. So let’s have a look what’s in there: We got flesh, we got eggs, we got milk, fat, oil, processed grain, potatoes, apples, lettuce, tomato, carrots, peas, mushrooms, processed sugar, spices, garlic, onion, rice, cucumber, and maybe a bit of cabbage, if you’re lucky. So if you count all that up, that’s only 20 different things in all those dishes just repeated loads. It’s basically the same stuff recycled in each dish. Maybe I’ve left some ingredient out here or there, but you get the gist of it. But the funny thing is as well, 17 of those ingredients are vegan, and only three of them actually contain animal products. So going back to our original sheet, Yes, it’s true. It’s not an exaggeration. I have much more variety in my diet. Literally double the amount of variety as the average meat-eater has. So no, a vegan diet isn’t restrictive whatsoever if you actually look at it from an objective standpoint. And additionally, any animal food that you want, be it eggs, meat, cheese, any of those animal foods, you can just get vegan versions of them anyway, so not only are you not missing anything, I actually have way more food in my diet, so it’s actually really ironic that people say that a vegan diet is restrictive. So anyway, I hope you enjoyed the video for today and please share this with your meat-eater friends, especially if they ever say to you that they’re not going to go vegan because you can’t eat anything on a vegan diet. It’s absolute nonsense. But anyway, if you enjoyed this video, maybe you’ll enjoy this video as well. And I’ll see you in the next one.