Tasting 28 dishes! KERALA SADHYA at Vembanad, Bangalore|Vegetarian Malayalee Food|4 TYPES OF PAYASAM

Tasting 28 dishes! KERALA SADHYA at Vembanad, Bangalore|Vegetarian Malayalee Food|4 TYPES OF PAYASAM


You know there’s nothing like tasting rice in a nice savoury gravy. I think we in the south, we love our rice. There’s nothing that satisfies us like rice does. Now I love my Malayali food. And what I really like about Malayali food… … is the vegetarian sadhya that is usually served… … during festive occasions. So be it during Onam, Vishu, or at a wedding feast… … the sadhya rules the table when it comes to great vegetarian Malayali food. And today we’re driving out in search of
some great sadhya. Now whilst there are many restaurants in Bengaluru that serve up good malayali food… … there are few restaurants that serve up
a great sadhya. So we’re here today at The Paul… … a hotel located in Bengaluru. And we’re going to check out their sadhya at their Keralan restaurant called Vembanad. And I’m told they serve up a delicious sadhya. So let’s go and check out the sadhya at Vembanad at The Paul. Hi Chef, how are you?
-Hi Mr. Kripal, I’m doing good how are you? I’m doing well. So I’m with Chef Krishna who’s the Executive Chef for The Paul. And the sadhya here is typically done in groups of 12, 15, 18, because… … with all that food, you need a large
number of people to… … savour that meal. But as a special case, Chef Krishna has
done the sadhya… … specifically for my indulgence. So chef, I have a question to ask of you. Of course when you enter the Paul… … and you enter Vembanad, you definitely feel like you’re, you know… – Entering Kerala.
… entering Kerala… … and you have a slice of Kerala so to speak. But how do you ensure the authenticity of the food? How do you ensure that the food… … the dishes that you serve during sadhya… … are as authentic as traditional, as one would be served back in Kerala? I do have a chef from Kerala and he’s taken over Vembanad. He is Chef Binu. He makes the food… … very unique and every individual dish is a perfect one. So we’ll get to the sadhya on the table shortly. But before that let’s go into the kitchen
and see what’s cooking. So we’re here in the kitchen at Vembanad… … The Paul and I can see all these sadhya dishes already ready and that is… … Chef Binu, who’s in charge of the
sadhya here at Vembanad. -We’re at the end stage of the Avial. This is the Avial that’s being made.
-Yes -Avial means mixed vegetables. Avial means mixed vegetables? So are there any specific vegetables that need to go in for the Avial or any… … all vegetables? Few vegetables are there like yam, cucumber, beans, carrot, potato… … all those things will be there. I can see some drumsticks there. Last we will mix with the pure coconut oil Pure coconut oil, of course! We’re having Malayali food. Without coconut oil, I think there can be no Malayali food, right? So this is just for that finishing. Just so you get the aromas. But the oil that you use to cook the… … Avial, is that also coconut oil?
-Yes This Avial looks delicious. So Chef, how many dishes do we have in total? -28 dishes total.
28 dishes! So we have 28 dishes for lunch today. And after seeing all these dishes… … and watched that beautiful Avial… … with its beautiful aromas, being prepared… … I can’t wait to get to the restaurant… … and begin my sadhya here at Vembanad, at The Paul. So Chef, thank you very much. I’m looking forward to tasting all these dishes. -Thank you Sir Thank you, thank you. So my banana leaf is already on the table… … and we’re set for the sadhya to begin. So I’ve got warm jeera water. And I’m told it helps in digestion. Inji Pulli. Maanga Achaar. Narangya Achaar. So there is a sequence in which the dishes are served… … and there is a position for each dish on
the banana leaf. I think we’re already running short of space on this leaf. But there are more dishes to come. Well I guess there are so many dishes so
you’ve got these… … teeny weeny portions of each dish. I’m sure if we want more, they will serve us more. And I think probably we’re at 20-23 dishes… … on this leaf at this point in time. So this is the… … Inji Pulli which is a pickle with ginger and tamarind. Then you’ve got the Maanga Achaar
which is a mango pickle. You’ve got the Naraangya Achaar, which
is the lemon pickle. And then of course, you have the Ulli Theeyal which is the button onion vegetable. You’ve got another vegetable here made of beans. I don’t quite remember the name. This is the Kootu Curry which is made
with the Bengal gram… … and some yam. And then you have the Eriserry which is made with pumpkin… and the chauli or the lobia (black eyed peas). The beans. This is the Moru Curry. … and this is with the lady’s finger and the buttermilk. And then of course you have the Avial which is what we saw being cooked. And to round off the meal, of course I have my boiled rice. I have some Parippu, that is, the lentils with the ghee. We also have the Cabbage Thoran here. And then here we have the… … Pineapple Pachadi. Then you have the Beetroot Kichedi. And then you have the Kaalan which is made with ripe banana. And of course, speaking of banana, we’ve got the banana here. And we also have the Sharkara Upperi which is the… …chips. And then also the… … banana chips. I think these are also called Upperi I’m not sure. And then you have the chilli and the Pappadam. So let’s get started. And I’m told… … one should begin with the Nei Parippu. Aah, this nei parippu feels… … soft to the touch. I can feel the soft… … grainy texture of the parippu or the lentils. Mmmh. In fact this parippu is very mild in its flavour… … and I’m told this is… So I’ve got the sambar here. The sambar is made with… … ulli, which is the button onions and some carrot. I think there’s also some beans. This sambar has a bit of a tang. I think the boiled rice leaves you very satisfied. I’m going to taste some of the pickles now.
Begin with the… … Inji Pulli which is the ginger and tamarind. Mmmh. You have that sour hit of the tamarind… … and then you have that warm heat of
the ginger as you… Go for some more of the pickle. This is the Maanga Achaar or the raw mango. Well there is that heat but not too spicy at all. I like the fact that mangoes are soft. So they’ve soaked in all those pickling spices. Let’s taste a bit of the lemon pickle… … or the Narangya Achaar. That’s more bitter than the other two pickles. In fact it’s a little too bitter… … but I guess the lemon pickle has to be bitter. I’m going to taste some of this Ulli
Theeyal which is the… … vegetable preparation made of onions. Mmmh! I love the savoury sweetness of that Ulli Theeyal. I think I’m going to call for some more rice, because I want to taste the rice… … with some of these vegetable preparations. Let’s taste some of the Kootu. I love the roasted spices in this one. You have the earthy texture of the yam… Go back to the rice and sambar. You know there’s nothing like tasting rice… … in a nice savoury gravy. Be it a sambar, be it a rasam… … or a simple dal prepared well. I think we in the south… … we love our rice. There’s nothing that satisfies us like rice does. I think I’m going to taste the Mezhukupuratti next. This is a preparation made with beans. Long beans and onions. I’ve asked for some more sambar. The
sambar is delicious! We’ll just portion our rice. I think what makes it so satisfying are all
the vegetables… … that have gone into it. There’s some… … eggplant. There’s the ulli, which is the button onions. There’s the carrots. Theres’ some beans. So all that nourishment from the vegetables along with the spices… … make that sambar so tasty and so satisfying to eat. Mmmh. I’ve been told Olan is what you eat… … when you’ve got too much spice on your palate. So this is made with coconut milk. There’s some lobia. There’s some onions and white pumpkin. Mmmh. I was feeling the heat from the ginger… … and the robust spices that went into the Kootu Curry. Next we’re going to taste the… … Erissery. Now this Erissery is made with… … of course, there’s coconut I can already
feel it to the touch. This is made with pumpkin… … and black eyed peas. Mmmh. You know what I really love about everything that I’ve tasted here so far… … is that each one of these dishes… … has its own character, has its own personality. Sometimes when you’re tasting 20-25 dishes… … they all seem to merge into one another, flavour-wise. But out here at least from all the dishes
that I’ve tasted… …each one has its own personality and its… … own individual flavour. Mmmh. Let’s taste the Vendakya, or the lady’s finger, Moru Curry. Mmmh. You know, this lady finger, I thought would be mushy, but they’re not. They have the pop of the… … vegetable and of all the seeds inside, intact. I think they… … sauté the ladies’ finger in some coconut oil… This is the Avial that we saw being cooked there. So gentle in its flavours. And the crunch of the vegetables. You can also taste the… … coconut oil that went over… … as a final drizzle on this Avial. You have some drumsticks as well. Mmmh. I love the marrow of the drumstick. Yes! Lovely! I want some more drumsticks, tender drumsticks. The flavour or the taste of the marrow… Time to get some pappadam into the rice. Just to get that added dimension of crunch. Mmmh. Now that we’ve tasted, actually not tasted, we’ve finished this entire… … line of vegetables here, let’s move on to the… …centre line, so to speak.So this is the Cabbage Thoran. You can taste the sweetness of the coconut. Time to taste some Pineapple Pachadi. Mmmh. It’s got an amalgam of sweet and sour flavours… … and that crunch. The acidic crunch of the pineapple. This is a dish that I’ve not paid too much attention to, in the past but this is… … Kaalan, which is the dish that’s made with ripe banana and yogurt. And then this is the Beetroot Kichedi. Grated beetroot, yogurt, and a bit of tempering. And there’s some mustard that I can taste in this. Now that I’ve tasted all these vegetables, each one with their own unique flavour… … the pachadis have helped cleanse my palate… … and ready it for the next serving… … which will be the rasam. I think we need to oomph up the spice… … quotient a bit with some Inji Pulli… … or the ginger tamarind pickle. I love the warmth that comes from the ginger that coats your palate. I love it so much, that I’m going to go for all of it in this bite. This is going to be a spicy bite. It’s going to be a bite that’ll make the back
of my head sweat. But this will be one deliciously satisfying bite. Mmmh! You taste the concentrated tamarind flavours. You taste that mild heat that comes from the pepper. And then you’ve got the ginger… … with its gentle warmth. Just coats your palate. Just leaves you feeling nice and warm on the throat. Lovely! Go for a bit of the Pineapple Pachadi. There’s a bit of fire now happening inside my throat! But that Pineapple Pachadi is helping soothe things down. Mmmh. I almost forgot the upperi or the banana chips I haven’t been paying too much attention… … to the sharkaravaratti which is made with… … banana, jaggery. Mmmh. That was a bit of a bite there. And some dry ginger as well. Buttermilk. To wrap up our sadhya here, some buttermilk. Thick buttermilk. This is not really the thin watery buttermilk. But this buttermilk has a bit of thickness… … has a bit of body to it. On the rice. I’m told the the traditional way of having the buttermilk at the end of the meal… … is to offer your palm… … for the buttermilk to be poured into it. You drink part of the buttermilk… … and you pour the remaining on your rice. I’m told the classic combination to have the… … buttermilk and the rice is the Kondattam… … which are the chillies which are first steeped in yogurt… … sun-dried and then fried. It’s a combination of salt and spice. So I think I need to quickly chase that with the buttermilk rice. I can feel the heat of the chilli at the back of my throat. You don’t taste that chilli at first. But that heat of the chilli creeps up on
you. And right now… … there’s a bit of a fire… So there’s some pappadam that’s just served that’ll also go into my dessert. So this is the first of the desserts here as part of the sadhya. This is the Parippu Payasam or the lentil payasam. That’s a tasty payasam. But I’m told the way to have it is to take
some of this pappadam… … break it into the parippu payasam. Peel the banana. Take a bit of the banana… … break this down into the payasam… … with the pappadam. This is a whole new combination in my mouth. So I’m tasting the sweetness of the parippu payasam… … which goes very well with the banana. The sweetness of the banana. And then you’ve got the pappadam… So I think that’s dish number 26, 27, and 28. This is the Chakka Payasam or the payasam that’s made with jackfruit. Then you have the Paal Ada which is rice flakes. And then you have the Semiya Payasam
or the vermicelli payasam. So I think I’m going to begin with the… … semiya payasam or the vermicelli here. I like the toasty notes of the cashew. So the payasam by itself is perfectly sweetened. It’s not too sweet. It’s not under-sweetened as well. But when you bite into that raisin… So this is the Paal Ada which is the rice flakes… milk, raisins, and of course there’ll be sugar. You know, both have sugar but in the Paal Ada… … you get the flavour tone of caramelized sugar which also explains… … the difference in colour between the Semiya Payasam and the Paal Ada. It’s got this mild caramel… And last, but not the least, we have the Chakka Payasam… … which is made with ripe jackfruit. I’m told jackfruit are nearly out of season… … so I’m probably having the last batch of the Chakka Payasam here at Vembanad. So you’ve got that intense ripe jackfruit flavour hit. I’m glad I tasted this after the other payasams. Had I tasted this first, I don’t think… … any of these payasams would have held to the strong flavour of the jackfruit… … in the chakka payasam. This has been a delicious meal here at Vembanad, at The Paul. You know when you step into Vembanad… … you literally feel like you’ve stepped into Kerala… … when you look around at the decor, the ambience… …the vibe that you get from this restaurant. But beyond that, it’s the food… … that transports you literally back to Kerala. I think each one of the 28 dishes that I tasted… … was unique in its flavour, was unique in its character… … and unique in the impression that it left on your palate. So Vembanad serves up the sadhya… … during Onam, during Vishu and other festive occasions. But I’m also told that they serve this up if you make a special request with a group of… … family and friends. … culinary aspect of Kerala… … do call up Vembanad and book for yourself… … a sadhya meal experience out here. Having tasted it, I can definitely tell you that you’ll enjoy the experience. So until the next episode of Gourmet On The Road. stay safe, and happy eating! If you enjoyed this video, don’t forget to subscribe, share, and leave a comment. If you’d like to support Food Lovers TV… … do log on to foodlovers.in … … and hit the ‘Support Food Lovers’ banner. Links in the description below. Happy eating!